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Nursery

  • Hairy Maclary From Donaldson’s Dairy by Lynley Dodd

    Hello everyone!

    This week’s story is Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy by Lynley Dodd.  This really is in my Top 10.  I adore the rhymes and reading them.  There’s a wonderful rhythm to reading the story.  My favourite character (besides Hairy Maclary) is Schnitzel von Krumm viz a very low tum!  There are a many books in this series which have some fantastic characters (like Slinky Malinky).  I’ll be reading a few more of the books so keep checking back.

    Listen carefully for the rhyme.  Remember to listen for the end sounds in the words, that’s the bit that sounds the same and rhymes.  What words can you think of that also rhyme, spots and pots for instance.  Can you make up your own rhyme such as  Scarface Claw has a paw (they don’t need to be great rhymes).  There are lots of rhyming games to play too.  Get  2-3 objects together which rhyme, put one more in the group that doesn’t rhyme.  See if you can pick out the objects that rhyme.  Nursery rhymes are fantastic for hearing rhyme too.  Playing games with names (I’m a poet and I don’t know it), Jane lives down the lane.  Sam loves ham.  It never fails to produce giggles.   It’s also a game you can play anywhere, anytime, in the car, supermarket, driving, walking, etc.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy - Hairy Maclary and Friends (Paperback)

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs. Howe, Mrs. Bain, Mrs. Mitzman, Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Bence

     

  • This week in Nursery

    Hello Everyone!

    What a busy week we have had in Nursery and what fun we have had!

    We have been thinking about the letters in our name and thinking about rhyming words. For example, we have had lots of fun working out what rhymes with ‘cat’ – we thought ‘mat’. Did you know ‘Bain’ ( as in Mrs Bain) rhymes with ‘train’?

    In our Literacy and on  ‘No Pens Wednesday’ this week we have been using letters on stones to spell out our name and using cooked spaghetti to make the letters in our names – a really fun and easy activity to try at home.

    In Child Initiated Learning we decided to put the toy cars and animals away and instead this week the children have been in the sandpit and playing with the water wall (don’t worry we had aprons on and we used warm water – as it was a little cold outside some days!)  Outside we also had a hunt for our number of the week –  number 4. It was hiding in lots of places in the outside space – some children also found the rouge number 5!

    On Thursday afternoon  in Child Initiated Learning a group of children thought they saw monsters in the woods! So we rolled with it, got our coats on, and the whole class tiptoed up to the woods to see if we could spy on them – one adult was told ‘be careful, you might get eaten if you get too close.’ -Thankfully on further questioning they confirmed that it wouldn’t be a good thing!

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care stay  safe, and enjoy the long weekend!

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • This week in Nursery

    Hello Everyone!

    What a lovely week we have had in Nursery –  we have been very busy crafters. In Child Initiated Learning we have made rockets (and even tested them outside!). Some of them have been hung up so you can see them when you arrive at Nursery.

    We have also made lots of playdough this week – inside and outside. The children were very good at helping to make the playdough before playing with it. As well as mixing in colours, one day we even used special sprinkles (cinnamon) to add to the dough as the children were making cakes with it.

    On Friday  children were in the woods and made Pumpkin Soup, we found the three ingredients and mixed it all together, taking turns and working together – have you read the story at home? It is on the blog if you would like to listen to it again. Inside the children wrote out notes and posted them in the postbox. We thought sending notes to each other was a kind and nice thing to do after reading the book HUG and talking about what we can do instead of hugging if our friends are sad.

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

     

     

  • Monkey Puzzle by Julia Donaldson

    Hello everyone,

    Today’s story is Monkey Puzzle by Julia Donaldson.  It’s a story about a little monkey who can’t find his mum and a butterfly who tries to help him.  All sorts of confusion and mayhem unfolds because the monkey hasn’t given the butterfly the key information he needs to be successful.  Too often we’re not specific enough when speaking.  We say “there!” and point when we should describe what we need to look for.  For instance, you wouldn’t give someone directions by saying it was “over there!”, we say take a left at the next T Junction.  Using language that describes where or what something is or looks like helps children to pay attention to the finer details.  “Your red mittens are next to your scarf.” Understanding positional language and adjectives really supports their language development and ability to follow instructions.  When children hear this as part of their everyday language they will confidently use it themselves.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Monkey Puzzle By Julia Donaldson

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

     

  • Bushey Remembers

     Last week at Merry Hill the children learnt about the importance of remembrance day and why we hold a 2 minute silence on this day.
    We enjoyed making poppies using a variety of media. We gave some of our pictures and poppy rocks to St James’s Church, Bushey and they can be seen around the church and surrounding area. Have a look at the clip below to see them. Lots of our pictures can be seen around school particularly in the courtyard area too.
  • This week at Nursery

     

    Hello Everyone!

    This week at Nursery we have been having lots of fun outside. On Monday everyone went on a Listening Walk – we cleaned out our ears and walked up to the playing field and listened to the sounds around us. Amongst other noises, the children pointed out the sounds of birds, cars and a chainsaw (in an adjacent garden!). As well as listening to the different sounds around us and what they might be,  we spotted birds, squirrels, nests and aeroplanes up in the sky. In Child Initiated Learning there has been the option of being builders outside with hats and tool boxes – we’ve had some very busy workmen and a couple of workmen working in a team told us the house would take ‘two weeks to fix’! 

    We have also been learning about Diwali this week and have made our own Diyas. We mixed up the salt-dough together, shaped them and once they were cooked and dry we painted them and decorated them with bright jewels – The Nursery team thought they looked amazing, we hope you do too! You can ask and see what the children remember about the Festival and how we made the salt-dough. We have really been working on our listening skills this week.

    On Friday we loved seeing the children in their sports kits for Children in Need. In keeping with learning about Diwali this week we did some amazing Bhangra dancing (several times over the day!). We watched and learnt how to do some steps individually and then dancing along to the music  – what energetic children there were!

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper

    Hello everyone,

    This week’s story title is Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper.  It’s a wonderful story about working together to get a job done.  Unfortunately, sometimes things don’t always go to plan and we need to take into consideration the needs of others.  Occasionally, this can be a hard thing to do.    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Everyone is happy with their jobs until one member of the team wants to do something different.   Is this fair?  Why do you think that?  There isn’t a right or wrong answer to that question when you take all the animals ideas and feelings into account.  Try to think about how the duck feels.   I’d get bored if I had to do the same thing every day.  I like a bit of adventure!  The other two characters feel differently.  They like doing the same thing.  It might give them the security and structure they need.  Whilst routine is very important, too much might become restrictive and not let you take chances.  Taking chances and risks helps us to grow and learn.  We all need to practice things as that makes us better at it.  Persistence and resilience are important things to remember.  It’s how we get better at things.

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • Oliver Who Would Not Sleep by Mara Bergman

    Hello everyone!

    This week’s story is about a little boy named Oliver who simply wouldn’t go to sleep!  The author is Mara Bergman and it was illustrated by Nick Maland.  Listen to the story with me.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Oliver Who Would Not Sleep: Amazon.co.uk: Bergman, Mara, Maland, Nick: 9780340893296: Books

    It’s really important to get enough sleep when you’re little.  While you sleep your body is growing and your brain is busy remembering what you learned all day.  At night time your brain puts that information away in your memory so you can use it again when you need to.  When you don’t get enough sleep your body can’t grow and your brain can’t help you to do good thinking and learning.   So it’s REALLY important to do get lots of sleep when it’s bedtime.

    How do you get ready for bed?  Having a bedtime routine is as important as having a routine at school.  One super way of getting ready for bed is having a bath and a story.  It helps you to relax.  Having quiet time an hour before bedtime is the best way for you to start to unwind, get mellow, feel calm like we do when we breathe with Genie on Monday mornings.  Bath time is a great time to chat about the day to your Mummy’s and Daddy’s.  Watching too much television or tablet screen time will get you over excited and will make it hard to sleep and definitely not before bedtime!  Sharing books is with your family  a much better way of calming ourselves for sleeping and can be a lovely, snuggily time.

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mrs Bain, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

     

     

  • The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson

    Hello everyone,

    It’s a classic story this week, The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson.  I wouldn’t be surprised if you knew the words by heart it’s such an often read story.  This is a great opportunity to extend the children’s language with all the descriptive language that’s used.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    The Gruffalo By Julia Donaldson

    Ask your child to join in the refrain.  “Don’t you know there’s no such thing as a Gruffalo?!”  The children absolutely adore repeating the refrain and their enthusiasm builds with each page that’s turned.  Could you make up your own Beastie and describe him?  Would he have three googly eyes with bright red lashes?  Is  your Beastie as tall as a tree or as wide as a bus?  There’s a lot of fun to be had describing things.  It’s something that will entertain them for ages and they can draw a picture of their Brilliant Beast and email it to us.  Enjoy!

    Also, next time you’re in the woods look out for The Gruffalo and your made up Beast.  Be on the look out and describe what you see.  The tree may have knobbly bark or there may be a lot of crunchy, dry leaves on the ground.  There are  several Gruffalo Trails in the area that you can walk (Covid restrictions allowing).  I’ve taken children up to the Horsenden Hill Gruffalo Trail in Greenford, Middlesex.  It’s a nice walk for this age group but better take wellies!

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

     

  • This is the Bear by Sarah Hayes

    Hello everyone,

    This week’s story is This is the Bear by Sarah Hayes, a fabulous rhyming story that we all enjoy in Nursery.  I do so enjoy the dog’s cheeky look at the end.  It’s all very subtly done.  Perhaps you have the story at home and can read along with me?

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    This Is the Bear: Amazon.co.uk: Hayes, Sarah, Craig, Helen: Books

    We’ve been talking about empathy and taking others feelings into consideration all this week.  The bear in the story went on an adventure and so did we.  We went into our forest area and hunted for the perfect stones to draw an emotion on, perhaps this is an activity you might want to do at home.  We’ve been practicing our happy, sad, grumpy and surprised faces and we are all rather good at it!  We’ve also been talking about the things that make us happy or sad.  Some of the fantastic ‘happy’ answers the children gave were fizzy bath bombs, blowing up balls to bounce, reading stories and playing with our friends at Nursery.  Some of the things that made us sad were popping balloons (too noisy), party poppers (they’re just scary),  children snatching things or pushing (because it can hurt).  We also practiced using our words and saying “Stop! I don’t like it!” when someone does something that isn’t very sensible.

    It’s a brilliant opportunity for children to really take ownership of their behaviour, and take others’ needs into account.  Although, children can forget this, as it’s a big concept when you are so little, they are becoming very good at problem solving and using their words when things haven’t gone the way they expected.  We’re also very good at remembering to use kind hands and words with our friends.  Lots of children have been making the teacher’s ‘hearts grow’ and going into the rainbow and pot of gold. Well done, we will be experts at this skill in a very short time.

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

     

  • Hug By Jez Alborough

    Hello everyone,

    This week we have been reading the book Hug by Jez Alborough. It is a story about love and belonging. Bobo sees his friend’s getting hugs from their families  but he can’t find his Mummy. The animals in the story show great kindness and empathy when Bobo begins to feel sad. They help him to find the the Hug he really wants and needs from his Mummy.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Hugs can express the deepest feelings without the need for words. Everybody needs a hug sometimes whether you are young or old, big or small, hugs are universal.

    When Jez Alborough wrote the book he shared his thoughts behind it. ” I liked the idea that if every Mum or Dad gives their child a hug after reading the book there would be one more hug in the world for each reading”. What a great idea to spread a little kindness and love.

    We have been talking about empathy and kindness during carpet time this week. As the children are starting to build friendships with each other these skills and emotions are so important as they interact and play together.

    Some of the things we practice daily at nursery: sharing our toys, turn taking, helping someone if they are hurt or sad, saying something kind to someone, using our manners, smiling and being friendly to others. We have been focussing on how it makes us feel if someone acts this way toward us and the children agree it makes them feel happy.

    Perhaps you could help to support this by celebrating the kind things that your children are doing at home. make a note of it and stick it on a kindness board or maybe put a button in a jar letting them know that you have noticed something that they have done. I’m sure they will feel very proud of themselves for being praised for their kindness.

    I hope you enjoy the story and remember when life feels complicated and overwhelming sometimes all we need is some kindness and a good Hug.

     

     

  • Come On Daisy! by Jane Simmons

    Hello everyone,

    This weeks story is Come On, Daisy! by Jane Simmons.  It’s about a duckling called Daisy who is so inquisitive and energetic that she forgets to do good listening when her mummy duck calls.  Of course, the inevitable happens and she looses her mummy.

    In class we’ve been focusing on how Daisy felt when she lost her mummy and how mummy must have felt.  It was decided that it must have been very scary for both of them!  This may be a fantastic opportunity to extend their listening skills, emphasizing the variety of contexts such as listening to  2 part instructions, such as hanging up their coats and putting their book bag away when they get home.  This will support them at school too.  I’m sure you won’t be surprised to know that listening skills are very closely linked to organisational skills.  Always make sure that you’ve got their attention, (eye contact is so important) then provide the information that they will need.  These habits will make it much easier for them in the future; they will be able to organise their book bags for school themselves, etc.  We’re hoping that you’ve begun to see how much more responsible they’ve already become.  We’ve been very proud of their progress and hope you are too.  Enjoy the story!

    Come On, Daisy!: Amazon.co.uk: Simmons, Jane: Books

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • My First Day at Nursery by Becky Edwards and Anthony Flintoft

    Hello Everyone,

    This week we are reading My First Day at Nursery by Becky Edwards and Anthony Flintoft.  It’s all about a little girl who isn’t so keen on going to nursery.  She misses her mummy and wants to go home.  By the end of the day she’s sad because she can’t stay at nursery and has to go home!  Sound familiar?

    We’ve been focusing on the similarities in the story and the activities we do at Merry Hill Nursery.  This might help with supporting the children’s conversation skills regarding what they’ve been doing while at school.  During our group discussions, children have said that one of their favourite activities is going outside and eating chocolate (unsurprisingly)!

    Click on the link below or copy and paste into another window.  Hope you enjoy listening.

    https://f.io/WW6x3TPY

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • Busy, busy, busy!

    Hello everyone,

    We really have been busy this week learning about number 1, reading our Here We Are story and learning the routines and boundaries at school.  Here are a few images that will give you some insight on what we’ve been up to.  Everything that we do has a learning context; it’s not just playing!

         Finding shapes and colours on our large carpet and moving our bodies building our gross motor skills.

     

     

     

    Filling containers and using language to describe full, empty, half full.

     

     

     

     

      Making cakes for Mummy which builds our fine motor skills and helps us to write.

      Banging the drum for Nursery!

    We listen to different musical genres and investigate further the ones the children like best.  This half term it will be reggae and country music (some of the songs from last week’s blog are ‘loosely’ in these styles).  Bob Marley  is currently the children’s favourite, particularly Three Little Birds (the children have exceptionally good taste) .  We’ve also listened to Jimmy Cliff so far.  Over the year we will listen to jazz, classical, classic ‘pop’ such as ABBA (one of Mrs Howe’s favourites), polka, bhangra and many more!

    Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence

  • Here We Are by Oliver Jeffers

    Hello everyone!

    Mrs Howe has made a video of the story we have been reading for you to share.  It’s called Here We Are by Oliver Jeffers.  It talks about our planet and people.  In class we have been looking at the different parts of our body and singing songs  like Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.  It was lots of fun doing it in different voices, squeaky, loud, quiet, happy, grumpy voices.  We sang the song very slowly and then very quickly.  We’ve also been looking at recycling and where to put our rubbish in class.  It’s important to tidy up not just rubbish but our toys!  The children are growing more confident with these routines every day.

    To support this half term’s topic of Time Travellers we will be looking at the changes in ourselves.  Could we ask families to send in two pictures, one of the children when they were babies and one of their immediate family? We will use these for two displays, one focusing on what they can do now that they couldn’t do when they were babies, such as walking, talking and feeding themselves.  The other display will focus on the members of their family, this will support children’s settling in as well.  We would really appreciate you talking to your children about the changes in themselves now that they are going to school and discuss who is in their family.

    Hope you enjoy the story (it’s long enough for a cup of tea!).  Click on the link or copy and paste it into another window.

    Here We Are written by Oliver Jeffers and read by Iris Howe

    Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth: Amazon.co.uk: Jeffers, Oliver, Jeffers, Oliver: Books

    Keep checking back, we’ll be adding posts all the time!  Until next time, do good looking for adventures, clean your ears out for good listening and turn your noggins (brains) on for good learning.

    Take care and stay safe,

    Mrs Howe, Mr Salih, Mrs Mitzman, Mrs Hill and Mrs Bence